Britain’s imperial monuments face a tough reckoning amid protests over Black Lives Matter

On sunday Black Live Matter The protesters Bristol, United Kingdom, 17th-century slave trader Edward Colston pulls a statue and throws it into the street before throwing it into the river.

Some praised the move, while others decided to call it a “rule of thumb”.

With a .Colonial history Wide across the century – and a mania for sculpting in the 19th century – Britain’s cities and towns are marked by monuments to individuals like Colston.

According to some, the statues have melted into the background of everyday life, but many people are now questioning whether they should still be standing in their way.

On Tuesday, London Mayor Sadiq Khan announced a commission to examine the future of future signs, including murals, street art, street names and statues, across the UK capital.

In order to ensure that London’s success and diversity are reflected in different parts of the capital, commissions have been set up to promote diversity in public areas of London.

Works against idols associated with the slave trade and imperialism have also attracted attention in other parts of Europe Protesters in Belgium The cancellation of several monuments to King Leopold II in recent days.
A string of Confederate statues in the United States Moved By authorities in the wake of widespread protests over the death of George Floyd

Although these measures have divided public opinion, they have sparked a growing conversation about what should be the statues of individuals like Colston, who benefited from the plight of so many people.

Winston Churchill

A statue of Winston Churchill in London’s Parliament Square was found distorted by the word “racist” written after his name, following the Black Lives Matter protest on June 20, 2020. Credit: Isabelle Infantes / AFP / Getty Images

Britain’s wartime Prime Minister Winston Churchill is cited as an example of inspirational leadership and presided over the defeat of Nazism in the country. In 2002, he was at the top Nationwide BBC survey The 100 Greatest British and his portrait are currently on the UK £ 5 note.
However, he also held views related to the social alphabet that would be considered racist today and his The policy has been blamed For the Bengal famine of 1943, which is estimated to have killed more than thirty million people. In March 2019, a study using soil analysis for the first time argued that the famine was caused by Churchill’s policies rather than a severe drought.

A statue of Churchill standing in London’s Parliament Square during the Black Lives Matter protest on Sunday was adorned with the words “… a racist”.

Cecil Rhodes

Oriel College is still in the process of removing the statue from Cecil Rhodes.

Oriel College is still in the process of removing the statue from Cecil Rhodes. Credit: Carl Court / Getty Images

Cecil Rhodes, who helped build Britain’s empire in South Africa, is immortalized in a statue outside Oriel College at Oxford University.

In 2016 the college refused to remove the work despite simultaneous pressure Rhodes will fall in Oxford The campaign group, however, has continued its efforts to bring it down.
“There is no place in South Africa, the United States, Bristol or Oxford for a statue that respects fair-black anti-racists,” the group said. Tweets Sunday, Tuesday invited people to a protest at the college.

Neither Oxford University nor Oriel College responded to CNN’s request for comment.

In 2015, a statue of Rhodes was removed from the campus of the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

“He represents the country’s former colonialist – domination, racism, miserliness,” said Rambina Mahapa, president of the student body leading the campaign to remove the statue at the time.

David Hume

A placard was erected in protest of the statue of the Scottish enlightened philosopher David Hume, disregarding his racist views.

A placard was erected in protest of the statue of the Scottish enlightened philosopher David Hume, disregarding his racist views. Credit: jpi media

In Edinburgh, a statue of 18th-century Scottish philosopher David Hume was decorated with a placard quoting his views on white supremacy.

Hume is considered one of the foremost thinkers of Scottish enlightenment, and his bronze statue sits on the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, the main surface of the city’s Old Town.

In recent years, however, Hume’s reputation has been tarnished, with more focus on his views on color. The statue’s left mark shows a line from Hume’s work “Of National Characters” stating that he was “fit to suspect Negroes … of being naturally inferior to whites.”

Nelson's column, with a statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson at the top, the tower above Trafalgar Square in central London.

Nelson’s column, with a statue of Admiral Horatio Nelson at the top, the tower above Trafalgar Square in central London. Credit: evenfh / Shutterstock

Henry Dundas

A statue of the Scottish politician Henry Dundas stands on top of the Melville Monument in Edinburgh.

Dundas, who has held several government posts, including the home secretary, is known for supporting the delay in abolishing slavery in the late eighteenth century.

The memorial was grafted during Sunday’s protests and a The online petition now calls for the removal of the statue of Dundas, And to name the streets named after him.

Preachers are advising to name these streets after Scottish-Jamaican slave Joseph Knight, who successfully freed himself in court, proving that Scottish law did not recognize slavery.

Different approaches

There are also calls for the removal of dedicated idols Admiral Horatio Nelson – who was famously victorious over Napoleon and is remembered at the top of a column in London’s Trafalgar Square – because of his Opposition to the abolition of slavery.
A similar application has been made about its illustration William Gladstone, A former prime minister who helped his slave-owning father demand compensation from the British government after the trade was banned.
William Gladstone served as British Prime Minister four times in the nineteenth century. His father owned a slave.

William Gladstone served as British Prime Minister four times in the nineteenth century. His father owned a slave. Credit: View image / Universal image group / image at the gate

From the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1999 to the demolition of Saddam Hussein’s memorial in Baghdad in 2003, to the demolition of statues of Lenin to the demolition of idols, it has been an honorable form of protest.

These examples of destruction were widely acclaimed in the Western world, but recent campaigns to remove the statue of the controversial figure in places such as the United States and the United Kingdom have divided public opinion.

An alternative approach was taken in Paraguay, where artist Carlos Colombino was asked to redesign a statue of former dictator General Alfredo Stroesner from 1954 to 1969. Instead of destroying the monument, Columbino surrounded most of its recognized part. Two huge blocks of cement as a memorial to the victims of the dictatorship.

About the author: Dale Freeman

Typical organizer. Pop culture fanatic. Wannabe entrepreneur. Creator. Beer nerd.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *